Sponsors

Donate

Without your support, Drunken Boat could not exist.

Please donate today.

Upcoming Events

Calls for Submissions

General Submissions are now open..

We are currently accepting submissions for our inaugural Book Contest judged by Forrest Gander for Poetry, Hybrid or Translation Manuscripts. Deadline is June 25th, 2014. We are also accepting submissions for Poetry, Reviews, Translation, Fiction, Art, and Nonfiction (deadlines as noted per genre).

We are also accepting submissions for two special folios to celebrate our 15th anniversary. We are accepting submissions to the Poetry Comix/Animation folio, guest-edited by Michael Chaney and Marco Maisto and the Affrilachian Arts folio.

Radha Says

The final collection by award-winning poet Reetika Vazirani, published by Drunken Boat.

Excerpt | Purchase | Review

Hide-and-Seek-Muse

Annotations of contemporary poetry edited by Lisa Russ Spaar, published by Drunken Boat.

Purchase

Follow drunken_boat on Twitter



Subscribe to our mailing list

Search

First, it’s Avital Ronell’s new book Loser Sons, which just came out, and is fabulous—a really serious look at authority, how it gets established and maintained, incorporating a history of childhood and the connections of both and all to Kafka, Kojève, Arendt, and many others. Ronell is brilliant at revealing intricate interconnections and their subterranean pathways. And doing so with amazing style. She’s the most fun philosopher writing today—someone who loves sculpting language, working it as a tight, compressed, and attitudinally explosive material.

And I’m reading Jean-Christophe Bailly’s The Animal Side, Catherine Porter’s beautiful translation of Bailly’s Le versant animal. It’s a really important contribution to the theoretical/critical re-examination of the human-as-animal and our relation to non-human animals that has been raging over the past ten years. Bailly’s consideration is distinctly poetic in that it’s open both in statement and in style—“we have to force ourselves to remain on a threshold that precedes all interpretation.” It’s a deeply opening book in every way that phrase can be taken.

And I’m reading Stacy Doris’s Fledge—gorgeous! Very slippery, and very soft. It has a sweetness to it that’s just heart-breaking. And a lot of humor. “Formerly we combed owls.” It covers such range, and yet also has a distinct intimacy; the reader feels directly spoken to, swept in, gathered up, held.

Bookmark and Share

Published May 10, 2012 - Comments Off

No Comments

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.